Reproduction Pocketbook Kits

Worked linen pocketbooks were often made in New England between 1740 and 1790, but reached their peak of popularity between 1760 and 1780. This type of worked pocketbook was more popular in America than in England. They were obviously valued by their owners, and mention of them can be found in wills, inventories, and diaries of the period. While leather pocketbooks were more common, being commercially available, more of these hand-worked examples survive, perhaps because of personal and sentimental reasons. Both sexes carried these pocketbooks. Women carried theirs inside their pockets (the large, U-shaped cloth bags tied at the waist and worn under the outer skirt). Inside the pocketbook, a woman might carry buttons, a thimble, hooks, needles, and sundry papers. Men usually carried business and personal documents, coins and paper money in theirs; hence women's pocketbooks were usually smaller than men's. The pocketbook itself was usually lined with a brightly color wool or silk fabric, and given a stiff interlining of cardboard. The ends were bound by an extension of these binding tapes, or a metal clasp. Cross stitched pocketbooks of this period are quite rare, with Irish stitch being the most common technique used. Some examples worked in Queen stitch survive, usually executed in silk rather than wool because of the intricacy of that stitch. Most of them were made with wool floss.

Samplers are in alphabetic order by the title or last name of the stitcher. To search the list for a word or phrase, type it in the box below and click the search button. For example, type ann to find all samplers with the name ann in the title. Type a to find all stitcher's last names or titles starting with the letter A.

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Showing 1 to 5 of 5 results

Photo
Davis Pocketbook
Pocketbooks
Origin and date: American 18th centuryLinen count and finished size: 35-count same as the original: 5-3/8"x3-1/2" folded, and 5-3/8"x 9-7/8" flat, 10-5/8"x4-1/8" when flat
Stitches: only cross and Irish stitches used
Source: Old Sturbridge Village
Kit with cotton floss: $42.00
Kit with silk floss: $85.00
Graph only: $14.00

Photo
E.S. Pocketbook
Pocketbooks
Origin and date: American 18th century
Linen count and finished size: 30-count same as the original: 9"x 8" when opened completely and flat
Stitches: Irish and eyelet stitches using Appleton crewel wool
Source: Old Sturbridge Village
Graph only: $12.00

Photo
Gardner Pocketbook
Pocketbooks
Origin and date: American 18th century
Linen count and finished size: 35-count, 10-5/8"x4-1/8" when flat
Stitches: cross and eyelet
Source: Old Sturbridge Village
Kit with cotton floss: $42.00
Kit with silk floss: $68.00
Graph only: $12.00

Photo
H S Pocketbook
Pocketbooks
Origin and date: American 18th century
Linen count and finished size: 35-count linen, the reproduction measures approximately 10-1/2"x6" when opened completely and laid flat
Stitches: Entirely Irish stitch with initials in eyelet
Source: Shelburne Museum
Kit with cotton floss: $36.00
Kit with silk floss: $65.00
Graph only: $12.00

Photo
Hunting Pocket
Pocketbooks
Linen: 35 count
Finished size: 7-1/2"x14" (open, flat)
Rated: Intermediate
Kit with cotton floss: $61.00
Kit with silk floss: $130.00
Graph only: $15.00

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